Kent Tritle is one of America’s leading choral conductors. Called “the brightest star in New York’s choral music world” by The New York Times, he is Director of Cathedral Music and Organist at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City; Music Director of Musica Sacra, the longest continuously performing professional chorus in New York; and Music Director of the Oratorio Society of New York, the acclaimed 200-voice volunteer chorus. In addition, Kent is Director of Choral Activities at the Manhattan School of Music and is a member of the graduate faculty of The Juilliard School. Also an acclaimed organ virtuoso, Kent Tritle is the organist of the New York Philharmonic and the American Symphony Orchestra and a member of the organ faculty of the Manhattan School of Music.

UPCOMING EVENTS

Tuesday, March 23, 2021, 7:30 PM
Cathedral of St. John the Divine, New York, NY

CATHEDRAL CHOIR AND ORCHESTRA OF ST. JOHN THE DIVINE
Kent Tritle, conductor
Soloists to include:
Amy Justman, soprano
Kirsten Sollek, contralto
Lawrence Jones, tenor
Peter Stewart, baritone

J. S. BACH  St. John Passion

Wednesday, May 5, 2021, 8 PM
Carnegie Hall, New York, NY

ORATORIO SOCIETY OF NEW YORK
Kent Tritle, conductor

PAUL MORAVEC/MARK CAMPBELL   A Nation of Others
World Premiere oratorio celebrating immigrants’ arrival at Ellis Island
ROBERT PATERSON  Whitman’s America
Settings of poems from Whitman’s Leaves of Grass

RECENT NEWS

KENT TRITLE IS THE 2020 RECIPIENT OF CHORUS AMERICA’S MICHAEL KORN FOUNDERS AWARD FOR DEVELOPMENT OF THE PROFESSIONAL CHORAL ART

(press release – pdf)

Chorus America has announced its 2020 awards program honorees, and Kent Tritle is the recipient of the Michael Korn Founders Award for Development of the Professional Choral Art. Named after one of the founders of Chorus America, this award was established in 1978 to honor an individual with a lifetime of significant contributions to the professional choral art.

Kent Tritle Stars in WIRED “Masterminds” Episode:
What Conductors Are Really Doing

Kent takes a star turn in the latest episode of WIRED “Masterminds,” a new series of online videos from the celebrated platform that explores the intersection of technology and culture. “Masterminds” spotlights experts in various fields who let the viewer inside the finer points of their work; earlier episodes included “Former CIA Operative Explains How Spies Use Disguises” and “Amazing Illusions: Using Human Bodies to Create Shadow Dances.” Watch “What Conductors Are Really Doing” now.

Facebook Posts

3 weeks ago

Kent Tritle

Kent is back at the organ, here playing the Largo e spiccato from the Bach/Vivaldi Concerto in D Minor, BWV 596. Unfortunately, the cinematographer, something called iPhone, didn't bring its best game - apologies for the angle that doesn't get all of Kent's head! ... See MoreSee Less

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4 weeks ago

Kent Tritle

Kent says: "This week I want to share a video made by my friend and Artist in Residence at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, NYC, David Briggs. He’s an astonishing artist, and has captured the interior of the Cathedral accompanied by one of his amazing improvisations. I hope you’ll enjoy this!!"

David Briggs says: "St John the Divine is the kind of building which brings to mind the enormous scale of God's creation, but also has a warmth and intimacy, despite its size, which proves that we are all loved, down to the very last hair on our forehead. Quite often, at the beginning of a rehearsal, I'll take 5 or 6 minutes to perambulate the complete length of the building (601ft - the length of two football pitches) - this takes about 5 or 6 minutes. I still find it almost impossible to adequately comprehend the scale.

"A couple of weeks ago, I filmed this journey, from the west doors to the High Altar, and subsequently improvised a musical accompaniment, in the form of a huge, inexorable, quasi-Mahlerian crescendo. Sadly I don't yet own a moving tripod, so I'm afraid the iPhone visuals are a bit wobbly at times. Nevertheless I hope you will enjoy this synthesis of the visual and the aural, and that you'll get a palpable sense of the sheer scale of St John the Divine, both architecturally and acoustically."
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1 month ago

Kent Tritle

After last week’s post of Kent playing the first movement of Bach’s Organ Concerto in A Minor, BWV 593, after Vivaldi, here he is playing the second and third movements of the piece.
As he says: "This week we hear the rest of the story! There is nothing like a Vivaldi slow movement - the repose, the melody and the pathos. This you hear first; following is the brilliant third movement, which typically is an allegro (which actually means ‘happy’, not necessarily ‘fast’!). Here is the concerto form, displayed as I move between the two keyboards. The lower keyboard represents the fuller orchestral ensemble, while the upper keyboard represents either the smaller group of soloists, or accompaniment to a solo voice played on the lower keyboard. The opening few bars are known as a ‘ritornello’ (literally, returning theme) - this figure returns in various forms between the sections for soloists (again, the upper keyboard usually). Enjoy!!"
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1 month ago

Kent Tritle

Here is Kent back at the organ of Christ the King Episcopal Church in Stone Ridge, NY, playing the first movement of Bach's Organ Concerto in A Minor, BWV 593 - transcribed by Bach from Vivaldi's Concerto for Two Violins in A Minor. ... See MoreSee Less

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